Weekly Photo Challenge; Changing Seasons Royal Holloway University of London, Surrey

I have found this challenge quite difficult, because I have wanted to show photos of the same place in different seasons, and apart from my back garden, I have hardly any photos of the same place from the same angles in different seasons.

Then I remembered my university. I studied physics at Royal Holloway University of London in Egham. The original university was a beautiful red brick building that reminds many students of Hogwarts!

Thomas Holloway was a self-made multi-millionaire whose fortune had been made in patent medicines. He founded Royal Holloway College in 1879 after initiating a public debate inviting suggestions as to ‘How best to spend a quarter of a million pounds or more’. It was his wife Jane who suggested a college for women as the means by which Holloway’s money might effect ‘the greatest public good’. (RHUL History)

Thomas & Jane Holloway

Thomas & Jane Holloway

I went there for four very happy years, and as a result saw it in all seasons. It was such a photogenic building I took lots of photos, and looking at them with fresh eyes, I have found some from similar angles in very different seasons.  It is such a beautiful building, it lifted my spirits every day I drove through the gates.

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Royal Holloway University of London 2007

Royal Holloway University of London 2008

Royal Holloway University of London 2007

Royal Holloway University of London 2008

Royal Holloway University of London 2007

Royal Holloway University of London 2008

Royal Holloway University of London 2007

For other interpretations of this week’s theme have a look at:

Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons

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About Barbara

Born in Dublin, living in London with Peter, my two daughters, Wilson our Spaniel & Woordow our Malshih (Shih Tzu-Maltese cross)
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41 Responses to Weekly Photo Challenge; Changing Seasons Royal Holloway University of London, Surrey

  1. really beautiful photos 🙂

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  2. These are wonderful. The building does look like Hogwarts and especially feels like it in your winter shots. (Jane sure was a smart one, wasn’t she? What a great legacy to leave this university behind)

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  3. Leanne Cole says:

    Snow really does make things look like they belong in a fairy tale. I love the ones with snow the best.

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    • Barbara says:

      I love snow photos too 🙂 The best time ever is first thing in the morning when nobody has walked there before you… I have hundreds taken in 2010 when we had a much bigger snowfall than normal for this part of the country and as a result the schools were closed. We took my children & some of their friends to a big hill near Guildford with a sled & they had so much fun 🙂 Can’t wait to share them all!

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  4. Grannymar says:

    That building is beautiful and I can understand why it lifted your spirits every day.

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  5. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « Miljo Anne

  6. Miljo Anne says:

    How does it feel like to study in such a university like that? Amazing London!

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    • Barbara says:

      It was wonderful 🙂 I come from Dublin and we have a very beautiful University in the centre of Dublin that would also be good to attend too. The UK has some really beautiful University campuses, but Royal Holloway is definitely one of the best.

      Like

  7. Love your photos. Have traveled quite a bit. Unfortunately only managed to a couple days in London on our way back from Ukraine. Definitely need to find a way to get back for a proper visit.

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  9. Wonderful shots for this challenge!!

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  11. dragonkatet says:

    Wow, what a neat building! Your photos are great! I like the ones with the snow – they make the building seem even more old and majestic. I bet it would take my breath away to see it in person. Maybe someday. 🙂 Anyway, thanks for sharing!

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  12. brissiemaz says:

    Wonderful photos of a marvellous building….thank you 🙂

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  13. Al says:

    This is an architect’s dream, I imagine. Absolutely stunning building and you do it great justice with the camera. If we ever visit, put that on the list of touring sites!

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    • Barbara says:

      Not If you visit!! When you visit.

      This place looks magical in every weather, even fog. Never fails to impress. Look up Windsor Castle and Hampton Court Palace. Both also very near where I live 🙂

      The place made studying a dream come true. I loved my subject, the lecturers, the department, but even on my worst days, ill, tired, overworked…. Driving in the gates of this place lifted my spirits.

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  14. Al says:

    Yes, you’re right, when!

    I was saddened by the death of Maggie Thatcher. As I have said, she was a hero of mine. She and Ronald Reagan kicked butt together for 8 years and left a legacy for free enterprise and smaller government. Unfortunately, that’s being pretty much undone, at least around here. I know you don’t agree, but this nanny state our countries are headed for is a house of cards that will collapse under its own weight. You’re seeing it throughout Europe already.

    I’ve enjoyed your science posts. You are one smart gal and make it interesting for your readers. And yes, I did hear back from CERN. They said they’d like to talk with me just as soon as Hell freezes over. Any idea what they meant by that? Is it that cold there?

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    • Barbara says:

      As an Irish person I can’t share your admiration for Margaret Thatcher. She was not liked in my country, and she caused as much damage as she did improvements here. She was not liked by coal miners and steelworkers, and she sold off the social housing stock leading to the overinflated boom and then crash of the early 90’s and her housing shortage legacy continues today. They were not fond of her in the Falkland Islands either!

      As a pacifist and an Irish person, she rubbed me up all the wrong ways. I was a child when she came into power and her reign lasted till I started working, so she was the first British politician I knew anything about. I think Reagan was better for America than she was for the UK, but they were similar in their beliefs and policies. Many British prime ministers try to treat the UK as if it is the USA and the policies don’t translate!

      She was quite damaging to the position of women in the workplace, as she abdicated responsibility for her children and household to others, which is not something most women can do, and therefore she set back the cause of working women for many years. We were measured to her yardstick, and expected to ‘man up’ or stay at home. Things have only changed here in the last 15 years, and even still there exists a glass ceiling for those not willing to sacrifice family for careers. Maybe that’s how it should be? But while she was in power, women had a lot less of a choice.

      Saying all that, she was a very powerful person, and she was a strong leader, one of the strongest this country has ever known. She deserves admiration and respect. There will be many documentaries about her over the next few weeks, and I will watch them and try and see what others saw in her. I am much more a UK citizen now than an Irish one now, having lived here longer & raised my children here & married an English man. I have softened, as has the Queen, in my old age!

      I don’t think I will ever like the woman, but I’m not sure she wanted to be liked!!

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      • Al says:

        Thanks for that thoughtful and articulate reply. You are correct in saying I don’t know as much about her effects on England as I should, I basically admired her international moxie and results. Are you saying the people in the Falklands wanted to be taken over by Argentina? That goes against everything I’ve read or heard.

        My basic philosophy is this: no one, and I mean no one, has your interests at heart as much as you do. You can have a positive affect on your own life far more than any government or institution. If someone is acting like they do (and that can be a good thing) it’s because there is something to be gained by them as well. If you do go over to my other site, you’ll see my 14 laws. That pretty much sums me up.

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        • Barbara says:

          No, not at all re The Falklands.

          I just don’t believe in war. Too many pawns are sacrificed ‘for the greater good’ I don’t believe as humans that any one of us should have the power to send another to his/ her death.

          In all wars there are deaths. It is the job of the pawns that some of them will die in order for the battle to be won.

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          • Al says:

            I will reply to this and then leave you alone as far as politics go. By the way, in spite of my misguided opinions politically, I’m a fairly OK guy otherwise. My wife is a socialist and she has managed to endure me for lo these many years, so I use that as my testimonial.

            As for war, no person of sound mind would want or wish for war (or criminal violence for that matter). Unfortunately, for every one of those of us who fall into that category, there are an equal, if not greater number of bullies who don’t. That’s not an opinion, that’s borne out by historical fact. Ever since prehistorical Og beat Norg over the head for using his watering hole it’s been that way. I don’t like it either, but if it threatens mine of my families welfare then violence it must be.

            Have a good evening, hope I haven’t messed it up for you. I really enjoy our tete a’ tetes.

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            • Barbara says:

              Don’t worry at all 🙂 the world would be a very boring place if we all agreed!

              I am a strict pacifist, to a ridiculous extent, I would prefer to be killed than to kill. Saying that, you don’t get to touch my children!! I find that there are many more people who do not agree with me on this stance, than those that do. I think I was very strongly influenced by growing up in a country in the middle of a civil war. Car bombs and innocent deaths on TV every night broke my heart as a child. I could not see the point in killing people for a cause. No cause is worth another persons life. But that’s just how I feel, and I don’t impose that view on others, but occasionally it comes out, if the right buttons are pressed 🙂

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              • Al says:

                That is most understandable considering what you went through. I was “sheltered” in that regard, but never for a moment discounted that such horror was part of life.

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                • Barbara says:

                  Lots of my compatriots experienced the same childhood, but processed it differently. My dad described me as over-sensitive as a child. I probably still am a bit, but there are a higher percentage than normal pacifists in my age group from Ireland.

                  Off to sleep now… It’s been good to catch up again, it felt like ages!

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        • Barbara says:

          I like your 14 laws, they all seem spot on to me:)

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        • Barbara says:

          I should have said Argentina rather than ‘The Falkland Islands!’ You’re right, the islanders liked her I think!

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